March 1, 2017

Springtime Flowers Feature

For those of us not fortunate enough to live in eternal warmth, spring often signifies the much-welcomed peeling off restrictive layers, heavy woolen wraps and full length casings that double as winter coats. We’ve traded our cumbersome snow gear for the tailored sophistication of a trench coat and kitten heels. We breathe again and our world is filled with the budding optimism of sunlight.

Spring weddings are much like the light that breaks through the dense, grey haze of winter. They are flirty and fresh, bringing the first pops of bright color after the long departed summer hues have faded. They conjure images of lush rolling hills just beginning to sprout with green carpets and cobblestones wet from a light spring rain. Flowers, just like fashion, change for the season, and springtime flowers are some of the most beloved around the world. They are colorful, fun and bring sunshine into your days. Here at Bride and Blossom, we have a few of our favorite flowers that we love to work with during springtime weddings.
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Categories: Blog, Trends & Tips, We Love, Your Inspiration Fix

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February 6, 2017

Flower Feature: Tulips

 

Tulips via Flickr

Tulips via Flickr

 

Popular in home gardens worldwide, the tulip is an essential asset to many floral design recipes. Known for its wide range of colors, bright bulbs and symbolic value, the tulip flower is a fan favorite.  In fact, tulips are the 3rd most popular flower in the world.

There are over 75 species of tulips, such as the Dutch tulip and parrot tulip.  Tulips are available in a variety of shapes, dimensions and colors, making them extremely versatile.

 

 

Tulips were first recorded growing in the Ottoman Empire. The word tulip comes from the Turkish word for turban, due to its tall, round shape. Today, many recognize the tulip as the emblem of Holland. When roaming the streets of the Netherlands, beloved tulips play a significant role in the nation’s cultural traditions and are loved by locals and tourists alike. Tulips were first brought to the Netherlands in the sixteenth century. Flemish botanist Carolus Clusius wrote a book about tulips in 1592 and they suddenly became so popular that his garden was raided and bulbs were stolen regularly! As the years went by, the Dutch became so fanatically obsessed with tulips that bulbs became immensely expensive.  Tulipmania, the name now given for this curious enthusiasm for tulips, peaked in 1637 and is considered the first example of an “economic bubble.”  Buying one tulip bulb at that time would have cost you 10 times the average national income.
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Categories: Blog, We Love

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